Friday, April 3, 2009

Fighting Poverty in the Failed and Violent State of Somalia


Medeshi Medeshi April 3, 2009
Fighting Poverty in the Failed and Violent State of Somalia
Working on poverty reduction is hard anywhere in the world but is harder some places than others. World Concern is one of the few agencies that has worked in Somalia for over three decades. There is no effective central government in Somalia and the areas of our work are sometimes occupied by one of the rival groups and then another, sometimes from one day to the next. Violence in Somalia is always imminent. It is one of the most difficult and dangerous places in the world to fight poverty. We were recently asked by a donor how we are able to work even in those areas that are in the control of Islamic militants. Here is how our staff in Africa answered.
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Somalia has one of the worst human development indices and the south in particular bears the burden. Due to the protracted conflict and natural disasters there have been an estimated 3.5 million people in need of humanitarian aid and a further 1 million are internally displaced (Somalia CAP 2009).
World Concern has worked in Somalia for almost 30 years. Through that experience, we have developed an understanding of the Somali people, especially in the areas that you referred to in your email. The current program primarily targets the unarmed, marginalized Somalia Bantus, who have small farms, and people affected by leprosy. Because of frequent conflicts with neighboring pastoralists (herders) who come in search of water and pasture for their animals, World Concern expanded the program to address water issues for the pastoralists.
The program is being implemented in an area that is located away from the main trade routes, providing some protection from conflicting groups. The residents of the area are the marginalized Somali Bantus. One of the villages a major settlement of people affected by leprosy. The project is designed to benefit 45,000 people, 24,200 of whom are direct beneficiaries.
The Somali political landscape is very dynamic with frequent changes. World Concern has always worked with and through the community elders and their structures such Community Development Committees, and Sector committees for the various activities. These are manned by the beneficiary community who come from the target groups. We do not deal with the armed groups in any way.
World Concern works with the locally elected central committee of elders which has remained unchanged over the years in spite of the constant shift of power in the area. The Central Committee is in charge of selecting the Community Development Committee. World Concern has continually trained the Central Committee and the Community Development Committees to build their capacity for project implementation.
The present programming is aimed at saving lives and reducing conflict between communities through capacity building. World Concern through consultative meetings with the community leadership has shared responsibilities in the implementation activities.
What would happen if our programs were forced to end either by a decision of the US government or because of violence from the Somali groups in power in our areas?

1. We would have to immediately cease our activities without any planning or preparation.
2. It would negatively reflect on the image of World Concern in the community because we failed to honor the obligation of completing the program. This would also make reentry into the community difficult. It would enhance recruitment of militants.
3. It would negatively impact the work and reputation of our the local partners we work with on the ground, making them more vulnerable to violence
4. Most of the resources we and the communities have invested would be wasted because we would be unable to continue the activities essential to securing benefits to the people in the area of our work.
5. The very fragile local economy would shrink even further because of lack of employment and reduced commerce.
6 . The community would suffer even more. The already marginalized Bantus and leprosy affected people would suffer greater oppression and be deprived of access to services essential to their welfare. Without our work with both of the competeing communities, conflict between pastoralists and Bantu farmers would probably increase. Because we would not complete our planned activities, many in the area of our work would either lose their livelihoods. It would affect 80% of the pastoralists, 90% of the farmers, and 100% of those who fish as a major part of their livelihood.
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Doing good well is more than simply knowing how to pursue interventions with excellence, Working in places like Somalia requires a strong commitment to the Somali people, patience, great wisdom in complex personal and group relationships and a daily dependence of our staff upon God and a willingness to submit our ideas to His direction. It is only God who nurtures the courage of our staff to work in the face of uncertainly and sudden violence.
World concern

1 comment:

Munexico said...

It's great to know that the specific needs of the Somali Bantu are being addressed in addition to the Somali population as a whole. This is one of the most forgotten, most intense, humanitarian crises of our time. I commend those who are brave enough to risk their lives trying make a difference in this forbidding land. All my best goes out to you. If you'd like to view my videos about the Somali Bantu, please go to http://www.youtube.com/results?search_type=&search_query=denverbabushka&aq=f